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His film achieves that transcendence, but only through the destruction of the planet. A therapist told him a theory that depressives and melancholics act more calmly in violent situations, while ‘ordinary, happy’ people are more apt to panic. They already know everything is going to hell” (Carlsen). There are no news broadcasts detailing the approaching end, no attempts are made to stave off the cataclysm, and there are no lovingly detailed shots of dying cities and crushed iconic monuments.Since Von Trier admits he is a depressive, it is not surprising that he should make a film about the end of the world. According to one critic, “Dunst won the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival for her performance. When the end comes, it does so in typical low-budget fashion.

This collection sets out to analyze philosophical, psychoanalytic, and aesthetic contexts of the discourse of melancholia in British and postcolonial literature and culture.

It seeks to trace the multi-facetted phenomenon of melancholia from the early modern period to the present.

The collection also takes into account relevant recent concepts of melancholia in the fields of gender theory, postcolonial theory, animal studies.

Authors discussed in detail by a team of leading international scholars including Juliana Schiesari, Andrew Gibson, and Paul Gilroy range from Shakespeare, Sidney, Spenser, and Milton, Margaret Cavendish and Anne Bradstreet, to 18th and 19th century representatives like Mary Leapor, Thomas Carlyle, Robert Louis Stevenson and Joseph Conrad, to recent examples of postmodernist fiction and drama such as J.

Melancholia (2011), director Lars von Trier's gorgeous filmic meditation on the end of the world, is unique among apocalyptic cinema in that it makes global catastrophe a metaphor for clinical depression, both the filmmaker's and that of Justine, his heroine and cinematic stand-in.

Justine is a bride who seems wedded to her melancholia and to the approaching planet Melancholia, which seems the physical symbol of her depression and of her longing for death.

The cosmic catastrophe confirms the wisdom of Justine's depression and pessimism.

For von Trier, who identifies with his depressed heroine, melancholics are a superior breed, more enlightened souls who suffer because the world is too much with them.

(2011), director Lars von Trier’s gorgeous filmic meditation on the end of the world, is unique among apocalyptic cinema in that it makes global catastrophe a metaphor for clinical depression, both the filmmaker’s and that of Justine, his heroine and cinematic stand-in.

As the title declares, this is a film about depression.

In the first act, a black comedy, Justine systematically sabotages her wedding day because she is already married to her depression. Wells continued the tale of the cosmic catastrophe with his classic story “The Star” (1897), in which a rogue planet flies by Earth and most of humanity is destroyed.